Enceladus
Damascus Sulcus on Enceladus
Ghostly Fingers of Enceladus - PIA08321.
Jets spurting ice particles, water vapor and trace organic compounds from the surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus.
Enceladus

Enceladus

Courtesy of NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Enceladus


Enceladus [en-SELL-ah-dus] is one of the innermost moons of Saturn. Enceladus reflects almost 100 percent of the sunlight that strikes it. Because Enceladus reflects so much sunlight, the surface temperature is only -201° C (-330° F). It displays at least five different types of terrain. Parts of Enceladus shows craters no larger than 35 km in diameter. Other areas show regions with no craters indicating major resurfacing events in the geologically recent past. There are fissures, plains, corrugated terrain and other crustal deformations. All of this indicates that the interior of the moon may be liquid today, even though it should have frozen aeons ago. Enceladus may be heated by a tidal mechanism similar to Jupiter's moon Io.