New Gully Deposit in a Crater in the Centauri Montes Region - IA09028.
New Gully Deposit in a Crater in Terra Sirenum - PIA09027.
Clouds Near Ice Cap
Mars Floodplain and Mars Pathfinder Landing Site
Gullies
New Gully Deposit in a Crater in the Centauri Montes Region - IA09028.

New Gully Deposit in a Crater in the Centauri Montes Region - IA09028.

Courtesy of NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09028


Two Martian southern mid-latitude craters have new light-toned deposits that formed in gully settings during the course of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. Gullies were first described by Mars Orbiter Camera scientists in June 2000.

The new gully deposit in this unnamed crater in the Centauri Montes region has a light tone relative to its surroundings and was first noticed by the Mars Orbiter Camera science operations team in an image acquired on Sept. 10, 2005.

The deposit was not present in a previous image Aug. 30, 1999. The new deposit has characteristics indicative of liquid water and likely transported some fine-grained sediment along with it. The flow broke into several branches, and the material diverted and flowed around low obstacles. The depth of the flow is too thin to be measured in this image so a very small volume of liquid and sediment was involved. While the material flowed and easily budded into several branches, it also must have moved slow enough to not topple over some of the low obstacles in its path.

The new light-toned flow, by itself, does not prove that liquid water was involved in its formation. However, this observation show provides tantalizing evidence there might be sources of liquid water beneath the surface of Mars right now.